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CHS Cites 'Shifting' Standards in Fraud Allegation Settlement

John Commins, for HealthLeaders Media, August 6, 2014

An attorney representing one of the whistleblowers alleging that Community Health Systems committed fraud says that as a nation, "we have a healthcare delivery system where doctors and individual decision making, to some degree, have been shoved to the side by corporate managers."


Trotter

Wayne T. Smith
Chairman and CEO of CHS

Community Health Systems, Inc. and federal prosecutors have agreed to a $98.1 million payout to settle system-wide fraud allegations levelled by whistleblowers against the Franklin, TN-based for-profit hospital chain.

While they have agreed on a settlement, CHS and federal prosecutors disagree on what prompted 119 hospitals in the nation's largest acute care hospital chain to allegedly overbill Medicare, Medicaid, and TRICARE from 2005-2010 for inpatient services for patients who may not have needed to be hospitalized.

CHS Chairman and CEO Wayne T. Smith said the hospital chain was struggling "to operate in a complex and everchanging regulatory environment."

"The question of when a patient should be admitted to a hospital is, and always has been, a matter of medical judgment by the individual physician responsible for a patient's care," Smith said in a media release.

"Unfortunately, shifting and often ambiguous standards make it extremely difficult for physicians and hospitals to consistently comply with the regulations. We are committed to doing our best, despite these challenges. Because this is an industry-wide issue, we hope the government will work to devise sound and reasonable rules for the important decision about whether to admit an individual for inpatient care, and we appreciate the opportunity to engage in meaningful dialogue with the government over these incredibly complicated issues."

A CHS spokesperson amplified Smith's point by saying that the shifting standards, "such as the two-midnight rule, which has had numerous updates, clarifications, and additional guidance attached to it since it was issued in August 2013… make it difficult for ALL providers to consistently comply with regulations." 

Federal prosecutors said flatly that the fraud allegations stemmed from a "deliberate corporate-driven scheme."

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