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Poll: Physicians Bearish on Healthcare Reform

Cheryl Clark, for HealthLeaders Media, January 20, 2011

A national survey of 2,958 physicians indicates "frustration and dismay in a time of change," according to a report by Thomson Reuters and HCPlexus.

For example, 65% of the doctors said they believe healthcare will deteriorate in the next five years, while 18% said it will improve and 17% said it will stay the same.

The reasons given ranged from their political views of healthcare reform, to "anger directed at insurance companies and a lack of accurate planning in the reform act," according to the report.

When asked what kind of healthcare professional will treat the 32 million currently uninsured Americans who will have access to healthcare under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, respondents said that nurse practitioners will see as many patients as primary care physicians. The survey revealed that many patients will be seen by physician assistants.

Physicians who responded to the survey also said they believe that under PPACA, they will be treated less fairly when they submit claims for reimbursement. The survey was conducted in September, 2010.

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5 comments on "Poll: Physicians Bearish on Healthcare Reform"


Survey Guru (1/20/2011 at 3:40 PM)
The survey reported here is a self-selected, biased poll, much like those conducted by a magazine or website. It represents the 10 percent of readers who respond to polls that they rip out of the magazine. Anyone who states or makes comments about "Obamacare" has said more about their views than the other 150 words. Moreover, how can a "health care administrator" complain about bureaucrats? Healthcare administrators are bureaucrats!

bhks (1/20/2011 at 2:39 PM)
I agree with the 65%, not because of just regulation but also the fact that so many bright people are choosing other pathways and careers. The healthcare field is being way over regulated. Most people realize that physicians are not God and they do make mistakes. But to many parasites wait by the way to take advantage of even the smallest of mistakes. For a physician that is honest and wants to provide the best of care for his patient must do it in less than 5 minutes in order to make ends meet. Physicians have lost much over the last couple of decades and continue to suffer loss of respect, income, and the ability to treat a patient the way they feel will provide the best outcome. I too wonder why any bright young person would choose healthcare for a future?

inchoate but earnest (1/20/2011 at 1:15 PM)
Parker, it's worse than you have suggested; many physicians - particularly those in the last 10 or so years of their careers (a cadre it looks like is overrepresented in T-R's poll; 55% have <em>not even heard of<em> ACOs? Please - if you enjoy waking up with a measurable pulse, do NOT seek care from THAT clinician cohort....)- actively want to pretend that the world will continue along the track in which their training and careers were channeled to date - a world that took the primacy of their role in all sorts of care decisions for granted. That world is dissolving and - surprise! - they don't like the sounds of whatever might replace it. Guess who else wants to stick their fingers in their ears? Administrators like MCF, who have lived in the 'real world' (mmkay....) of rescue care off specialists their entire careers, and are looking down the barrels of system change that will expose their irrelevance, and in some cases their hindrance, to the effective health care of 95% of people in the US. So, to sum up - T-R has managed to poll an unrepresentative subset of the ~800,000 doctors in the US, and those doctors exhibit an exaggerated resistance to change. Dear Healthleaders editors: "dog bites man" is not really news.