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How a Bariatric Surgery Campaign Generated 20M Impressions

Marianne Aiello, for HealthLeaders Media, March 6, 2013

When you visit MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center's bariatric surgery page you don't see before and after photos of previous patients. You don't see images of the robotic surgery tools used for the procedure. And you certainly don't see smiling doctors holding vibrant fruits and vegetables.

(Yes, unfortunately, I have seen all of these things depicted on bariatric microsites before.)

Girl on Bike


What you see is a happy young woman pushing her bicycle down a wooded path.

This choice of photography is not unintentional. When MFSMC's bariatric surgery program received its designation as a Center of Excellence by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, it decided to create a campaign focusing not on weight loss, but on health and lifestyle gained.

"We are proud that we are helping those who have struggled for years to lose weight without success, but our program is not just about appearance," says Trina M. Adams, assistant vice president of marketing and communications for MFSMC. "Our mission is to improve the health and lifestyle of those we serve. That is what is helping to position us as one of the premier bariatric programs in the area."

This campaign direction has really resonated with consumers because above all, bariatric patients just want to get back to living a healthy, active life. To drive this point home, the Baltimore, MD, medical center used images of real patients and wrote carefully crafted messaging.

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1 comments on "How a Bariatric Surgery Campaign Generated 20M Impressions"


Larry Asher (3/7/2013 at 10:52 AM)
I don't see how this campaign is any different from hundreds of other weight loss surgery efforts run by hospitals across the country? Where's the insight and new angle we could learn from? It would help to know what the investment was in this campaign. Without it you can't measure ROI, just clicks and page visits, which really don't tell you much. P.S. it's "complemented"