Study: Care coordination does not save money

Journal of the American Medical Association, February 12, 2009

A study looking at 15 care coordination programs involving Medicare patients found that only two resulted in a change in hospitalization rates—and one of those two saw more hospitalizations. According to the study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, viable care coordination programs without a strong transitional care component are unlikely to yield net Medicare savings. The study also found programs with substantial in-person contact that target moderate to severe patients can be cost-neutral and improve some aspects of care.


MOST POPULAR

SPONSORED REPORTS
SPONSORED HEADLINES

SIGN UP

FREE e-Newsletters Join the Council Subscribe to HL magazine

SPONSORSHIP & ADVERTISING

100 Winners Circle Suite 300
Brentwood, TN 37027

800-727-5257

About | Advertise | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Reprints/Permissions | Contact
© HealthLeaders Media 2014 a division of BLR All rights reserved.