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Q&A: Ardis Dee Hoven, New AMA President, Outlines Roadmap

Joe Cantlupe, for HealthLeaders Media, June 20, 2013

From reimbursement challenges to figuring out what makes some physician practices great, the American Medical Association's new president, Ardis Dee Hoven, MD, vows "significant change" for doctors in the year ahead.


Hoven


Ardis Dee Hoven, MD

The state of medicine isn't pretty. Physicians are annoyed about reimbursements, disgruntled about ICD-10 billing codes, and electronic health record systems, and worried about the confluence of a looming doc shortages and a growing population of aging and chronically ill patients.

In the meantime, older physicians are bolting from their practices, while younger doctors face funding shortfalls in medical education.

The nation's largest physician organization, the more than 220,000-member American Medical Association, has been keeping a keen eye on these volatile issues. This week during the organization's House of Delegates annual meeting in Chicago, the organization introduced Ardis Dee Hoven, MD, an internal medicine and infectious disease specialist from Lexington, KY, as its 168th president.

Since 2005, Hoven has been in leadership positions at the AMA, first serving as secretary from 2008–2009, and then immediate past chair for 2011–2012. Hoven says her career treating HIV/AIDs patients through the early 1980s motivated her to become involved in organized medicine.

Hoven talked with me this week about her views on issues the AMA will be confronting over the next year.

HLM: What are your top priorities for the AMA?

Hoven: The first is stabilizing medical practices, and being sure our physicians can navigate the changes in the way healthcare is being delivered, [second] to be sure our patients are doing well and getting the highest quality care possible. I love the work we're doing around improved health outcomes. And thirdly, a huge one, is accelerating the change in medical education.

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