HealthLeaders Media QualityLeaders - February 5, 2009 | Thanks, Doc, And By The Way—Who Are You? View as a Webpage | Subscribe for Free
Thanks, Doc, And By
The Way—Who Are You?
Jay Moore, managing editor, HealthLeaders Media
The vast majority of patients in a new study couldn't name a single physician on their hospital care team. Such findings sometimes can be symptoms of deeper communication problems—but is it more important for patients to understand care processes and the role of each caregiver in those processes than it is for patients to remember names? [Read More]
    
 
Feb. 5, 2009
 
Editor's Picks

Rapist worked at L.A. County hospitals despite reviews of record
This is an unsettling story out of California about a convicted rapist working as an X-ray technologist—which entailed him working unsupervised with female patients—at two Los Angeles hospitals. This apparently wasn't a case of hospital leaders not noticing his criminal record; more than one manager reviewed his history and signed papers saying there was no reason his convictions should keep him from doing the job, according to the story. Somehow I doubt his patients would agree. [Read More]

Ethicists debate doctors who keep it personal
Stories about the few physicians who still make house calls usually speak of such caregivers in purely glowing terms for their dedication to helping patients on a personal level in an era of largely impersonal medicine. But this piece offers a different kind of question to ponder: whether becoming overly involved in patients' lives can cloud a physician's clinical judgment and ultimately compromise care quality. I wish the story could have explored the issue in even more depth than it does, but it's a good read, nevertheless. [Read More]

Harvard will stiffen rules for staff at med school
Good story here about Harvard Medical School revising its conflict-of-interest policies for physicians and researchers. The American Medical Student Association last year had given Harvard a failing grade on its conflict-of-interest policy because it doesn't provide definitive guidance on faculty receiving meals or gifts from pharmaceutical or device companies. This is a complex issue for Harvard; the university doesn't control its affiliated teaching hospitals, and those hospitals have their own conflict-of-interest policies that overlap, but are separate from, Harvard Medical School's policy. [Read More]
This Week's Headlines


UPMC cited for death on rooftop
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - January 27, 2009


Webcasts/Audio Conferences


From HealthLeaders Magazine
Flat-World Healthcare
Globalization is no longer an uncertain trend in the distant future. [Read More]  

Service Line Management
A Spinal Shift
As minimally invasive procedures consume a larger portion of spinal care, provider organizations have many opportunities—and challenges—in an increasingly outpatient service line. [Read More]

Leaders Forum
SC Program Puts HAIs
in the Crosshairs

Yesterday marked the launch of the South Carolina Healthcare Quality Trust, a statewide, voluntary hospital quality collaborative to reduce hospital-acquired infections and their associated costs. [Read More]
Audio Feature
Hospitals and health systems shouldn't let concerns about their quality scores or what their competition is doing paralyze them from starting the journey toward transparency, say Bruce Crowther, president and CEO of Northwest Community Hospital, Thomas C. Royer, president and CEO of CHRISTUS Health, and Wayne Sensor, CEO of Alegent Health during HealthLeaders Media's 2008 Top Leadership Teams Annual Conference and Awards. [Listen Now]
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