Five Ways The GOP Health Bill Would Reverse Course From The ACA

Kaiser Health News, March 8, 2017

Five Ways The GOP Health Bill Would Reverse Course From The ACA

Still missing is an estimate from the Congressional Budget Office that will detail not only how much the proposal will cost, but also how many people would gain or lose health insurance.

This article first appeared March 8, 2017 on Kaiser Health News.

By Julie Rovner

After literally years of promises, House Republicans finally have a bill they say will "repeal and replace" the Affordable Care Act.

Some conservative Republicans have derided the new proposal — the American Health Care Act — calling it "Obamacare Lite." It keeps intact some of the more popular features of the ACA, such as allowing adult children to stay on their parents' health plans to age 26 and, at least in theory, ensuring that people with preexisting conditions will still have access to insurance.

In some cases the elements of the law that remain are due to political popularity. In others, it's because the special budget rules Congress is using — so Republicans can avoid a Senate filibuster — do not allow them to repeal the entire law.

But there are some major changes in how people would choose and pay for health care and insurance. Here are some of the biggest:

Tax Credits To Help Buy Insurance
Both the GOP bill and the ACA provide tax credits to help some people pay their premiums if they don't get insurance through work or government programs. And in both, the credits are refundable (meaning people who owe no taxes still get the money) and advanceable (so people don't have to wait until they file their taxes to get them). But the GOP's tax credits would work very differently from those already in place.

Kaiser Health News

Kaiser Health News is a national health policy news service that is part of the nonpartisan Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

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