Study: Resident Wellness Affected by Changes in Personal Relationships

Residency Program Insider, December 7, 2017

Researchers found that a common resident coping mechanism was to gravitate toward coworkers and those with the ability to relate to their specific series of stressors.

This article was originally published in Residency Program Insider, December 1, 2017.

The process of becoming a physician is a long and bumpy road. Most, if not all residents, are able to persevere thanks to a mixture of determination, skill, and support from friends and family.

Using a series of semi-structured interviews and a theoretical sample of 16 Canadian residents, researchers collected data that suggests a drop in the quality of resident wellness when their personal relationships were tested.

As the residents’ burgeoning professional identities continued to evolve, it was found that their personal relationships began to take a backseat, thus creating a work-life imbalance that forced them to restructure their personal relationships to better accommodate a demanding work schedule.

The researchers found that a common coping mechanism seen in residents trying to regain a sense of personal wellness and avoid burnout was to gravitate toward coworkers and those with the ability to relate to their specific series of stressors.

Source: Academic Medicine

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