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CFOs' Leadership Role, Often Overlooked, Gets Some Sunshine

Philip Betbeze, for HealthLeaders Media, August 26, 2011

If you're a CFO reading this because you were attracted to the headline, I can read your thoughts:

"It's about time somebody noticed!" some little voice in your head has to be saying.

That's because when you're doing your job right, nobody seems to notice much. But we notice. In fact, CFOs are the linchpin behind a new HealthLeaders Media conference launching next month.

We're bringing 30 of the best and brightest healthcare CFOs together to an invitation-only retreat at Torrey Pines in Southern California to talk about the stresses and opportunities in today's rapidly changing healthcare business environment. I'll be one of the moderators at the event, and the location couldn't be better.

I'm hoping the ideas we kick back and forth over two days of intense focus will help us understand the important realities of the immediate and medium-term future as they affect hospitals and health systems—from the CFO's vantage point.

All right, I'll grant you, handling the money isn't the sexiest of jobs, but it's definitely one that has all the answers—at least your boss and the several thousand people who depend on your forecasts and decisions think so.

The CFO's desk is also the place where strategy meets execution. Once a major strategic change has been adopted, it's among your responsibilities to make sure there's proper investment and oversight to implement it effectively.

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1 comments on "CFOs' Leadership Role, Often Overlooked, Gets Some Sunshine"


bob (8/26/2011 at 2:23 PM)
I hope that you or other moderators at the conference urge CFO's not to be shy about involvement in non-financial issues in setting new directions for their organization in caring for patients, populations and targeted communities. They should be visionaries about health improvement, contributing right up front not only to "Return-on-Investment" issues, but also in discussion of the health improvement goals of necessary new investments.