Leadership
e-Newsletter
Intelligence Unit Special Reports Special Events Subscribe Sponsored Departments Follow Us

Twitter Facebook LinkedIn RSS

Will Paying Hospitals to Teach Each Other Get Results?

Philip Betbeze, for HealthLeaders Media, February 3, 2012

The Department of Health and Human Services believes that best practices, techniques and solutions for obtaining higher levels of quality and safety among hospitals should spread, um, well…like a disease.

Those are my words, not theirs, but allow me to continue with my bad ironic similes and consider that the $218 million the agency is investing in so-called "Hospital Engagement Networks" as Typhoid Mary.

The money, distributed among 26 organizations, will help identify and teach other hospitals and healthcare providers the solutions that have been already proven to reduce healthcare acquired conditions.

As part of the public-private Partnership for Patients program, the agency will distribute that money among 26 state, regional, or nationwide hospital organizations to be invested  in the infrastructure to help train their colleagues on best practices.

According to HHS, the recipients will "conduct intensive training programs to teach and support hospitals in making patient care safer, provide technical assistance to hospitals so that hospitals can achieve quality measurement goals, and establish and implement a system to track and monitor hospital progress in meeting quality improvement goals."

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Comments are moderated. Please be patient.

1 comments on "Will Paying Hospitals to Teach Each Other Get Results?"


A. Bibby (2/3/2012 at 2:03 PM)
Personally, it is a good idea for hospitals and other healtcare facilities to learn from OTHER like facilities. Oftentimes, practioners become too complacent and too "busy" to learn new and other effective techniques. I do not think; however, that hospitals should get paid to teach within... Either they get money for research or on the tail end by saving money from following some sort of quality improvement plan (i.e. decrease infections= decrease supply use= less call outs=increase marketability