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Hospitals Offer Amenities to Drive Patient Volume

Doug Desjardins, for HealthLeaders Media, March 23, 2011

The recession was bad for business in nearly every industry including healthcare, where patient volume at hospitals declined as people put off elective surgeries and procedures. But as the economy rebounds, some hospitals are abandoning austerity and moving in the other direction with an emphasis on making hospitals more like spas.

Kaiser Permanente recently upgraded the menu at some of its hospitals to include entrees such as marinated loin of pork, fresh fruit and vegetables, and other items patients would associate more with an upscale restaurant than a hospital kitchen.

Another example is Tampa's Center for Women's Oncology at the Moffitt Cancer Center, which remodeled its facility to look like a high-end hotel and added services such as spa treatments and massages.  "Maybe we can't be the Ritz-Carlton," said Jonathan Lancaster, director of the Moffitt Cancer Center. "But we should be able to at least make it like a Hyatt."

From a marketing standpoint, amenities that make patients feel like they're staying at a hotel are just as – if not more important - than a reputation for quality clinical care when it comes to driving patient volume. Or least that was the conclusion of a 2010 study titled "The Emerging Importance of Patient Amenities in Hospital Care."

The study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in December 2010 found that, "improvements to amenities typically cost hospitals more than improvements in quality of care, but improved amenities have a greater effect on hospital volume."

The study used as an example a 2008 remodel of the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles that was accompanied by a marketing campaign called "A Better Way to Get Better." The multi-media campaign focused on amenities the hospital had to offer, including family-friendly rooms and hotel-style meal service. And the campaign produced results. After two years, the number of people treated at Ronald Reagan UCLA who would recommend it or other UCLA hospitals to friends increased from 71% to 85%.

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1 comments on "Hospitals Offer Amenities to Drive Patient Volume"


jmaranan (3/24/2011 at 1:11 PM)
I just blogged about the very same topic for our website. In comparing one of our centers' patient satisfaction scores with those from 19 NCI-designated cancer centers included in the Press-Ganey Outpatient Oncology Database, none of the scores reflected answers to clinically based questions. Instead, the scores reflected qualitative and experiential activities like valet parking, ease of access and personal experience with the cancer center. However it is measured, it is evident that the patient-centered care model goes well beyond medicine and technology.