Physicians
e-Newsletter
Intelligence Unit Special Reports Special Events Subscribe Sponsored Departments Follow Us

Twitter Facebook LinkedIn RSS

4 Strategies for Fed-Up Physicians

Joe Cantlupe, for HealthLeaders Media, August 2, 2012

When the Atlanta-based healthcare staffing recruiter Jackson Healthcare recently took an online survey of physicians, it was pretty surprised and dismayed that 34% of physicians reported plans to leave the practice of medicine over the next decade.

 "What one doctor told me really struck me," Sheri Sorrell, market research manager for Jackson Healthcare, told HealthLeaders Media. The unnamed physician said he was in a grocery store with his wife and had an epiphany after they discussed "how my office worked, what I charged, and what my accounts receivable meant, and it was really nothing. Really," he wrote to Jackson Healthcare. "The insurance companies and the government decide how much I got for my services."

"Why was more of my life in a career that is becoming more and more restricted, more controlled by managers, clerks and accountants, more demanding, less fulfilling, less respected, and less financially rewarding daily?" the physician asked.

After two months, the doctor quit, according to Sorrell.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Comments are moderated. Please be patient.

2 comments on "4 Strategies for Fed-Up Physicians"


taylors (8/2/2012 at 6:10 PM)
Excellent article! The points are very practical and we are big supporters of the Fix Your Practice. The amount of money Practices loose by not collecting co-pays up front or having the billing in disarray is staggering. If Physicians and Management looks at the allowed amounts under their contracts and set a goal to collect it all rather than just 80% or even worse 0%, the economic picture would start to emerge as promising.

Tabor Nuns (8/2/2012 at 2:32 PM)
No one is leaving his practice. Leave and do what? Be a bartender? And why blame it on health reform headaches? WHAT headaches? Health reform starts in 2014, if you're having a headache now, it has nothing to do with reform. Sure, salaries may go down but they would go down no matter what the health insurance landscape is. Salaries have stagnanted for years yet doctors are not leaving the profession[INVALID]we dont' know how to do anything else!