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Da Vinci Robot Surgical Risks Detailed

Cheryl Clark, for HealthLeaders Media, April 17, 2012

Risk Factors
But there were certain factors that predicted an increased rate of mortality and other complications, including having a body mass index less than 30, patient's age 70 or older, and several factors related to a diagnosis of malignant disease such as blood loss, and need for transfusion. The BMI under 30 was attributed, in part, to nutritional issues resulting from metastatic disease.

Performing more advanced types of procedures, such as a liver resection, removal of parts or all of the pancreas, and lung resection and kidney transplantation, were also associated with higher complication rates. 

Procedures associated with intermediate risk and having lower complication rates, were listed as living donor nephrectomies, bariatric procedures, esophageal hernia repairs, endocrine operations such as thyroidectomies, colorectal resections, splenectomies, thymectomies, and gynecological procedures.

Basic, or lowest-risk procedures were identified as gall bladder surgeries, hernia repairs, and biopsies.

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2 comments on "Da Vinci Robot Surgical Risks Detailed"


Leanne White (12/19/2012 at 9:59 PM)
When something went wrong with my da Vinci surgery, IT had every thing to do with the Doctor's skill. Of course emergency surgery and 6 other procedures later, since the Doctor, quote and I quote, "didn't kill me, or leave me with an injury that couldn't be fixed" I had no grounds to sue him or at least have him write off the balance not paid by my insurance. Who cares that I missed out on more than a year of my life getting someone else to fix what he did.

bev M.D. (4/19/2012 at 6:25 PM)
"You don't leave big scars and adhesions, you have less post-operative pain, recovery times are shorter, and infection rates almost non-existent." I hope the study provided evidence to support this rather all-encompassing statement of superiority. Otherwise it's just more advertising. Was there such evidence? No doubt the article is available by subscription only......