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Urinary Catheter Process Measures Improve in MI

Cheryl Clark, for HealthLeaders Media, February 13, 2012

An increase in the number of catheter days for each patient is associated with an increase in the number of CAUTIs, or catheter-associated urinary tract infections, as well as other complications. That has prompted hospital infection control teams to step up efforts to remove catheters no longer needed and not insert them unless they're absolutely necessary.

Additionally, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services no longer reimburses hospitals the additional cost of caring for a patient with a urinary tract infection and has set a goal to reduce CAUTI by 25% by next year.

Urinary catheters were said to be appropriate for urinary tract obstruction, neurogenic bladder, urologic study or surgery on contiguous structures, sacral pressure ulcer (stage III or IV) with incontinence, and end of life care.

The interventions in the Michigan project included educating clinicians about the use of catheters, including distribution of "Bladder Bundle" manuals that included step-by-step description of the process, and of making sure to take daily assessments of catheter necessity during nursing rounds.

However, the Michigan researchers said that not all the hospitals improved their rates at the same pace or to the same extent. 

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2 comments on "Urinary Catheter Process Measures Improve in MI"


rachel (3/4/2012 at 7:10 AM)
I care for a spinal cord injured male patient, and almost any contact with his penis causes a spontaneous erection, even routine perineal washing or adjusting the sheets. This causes difficulty [INVALID]ing a catheter, which causes discomfort for him, and concerns me. It took some time for me to be comfortable dealing with a a male with reflexive erections in general, but now I am concerned because I feel a lot more resistance [INVALID]ing a catheter into him than with most male patients, particularly during the last few inches – I'm assuming that this involves his prostate and/or urogenital diaphragm. Do you have any suggestions or tips? As he doesn't have normal sensation below his shoulders (C4-5 injury), I have considered many things, including manually inducing an orgasm to allow his penis to become flaccid, but I'm not sure that would be appropriate, or even helpful. I've tried waiting up to 15-20 minutes after [INVALID]ing the lidocaine gel, but the erections are quite persistent – Any ideas, suggestions, or tips would be greatly appreciated! Thank you, rachel from <a href="http://www.brightmedical.com/adult-diapers">ADULT DIAPERS</a>

ADULT DIAPERS (2/19/2012 at 8:48 AM)
Urinary catheters were said to be appropriate for urinary tract obstruction, neurogenic bladder, urologic study or surgery on contiguous structures, sacral pressure ulcer (stage III or IV) with incontinence, and end of life care.