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Hospitals Offer Amenities to Drive Patient Volume

Doug Desjardins, for HealthLeaders Media, March 23, 2011

The study concluded that "in crowded hospital markets, especially in areas populated by well-insured patients, such amenities play an increasing role in the competition for market share."

A 2008 study co-authored by John Romley, MD, for the RAND Corporation reached similar conclusions. The study of Los Angeles-area hospitals found "an increase in a hospital's amenities increased its demand among patients studied by 38.4%." That compared to just a 12.7% increase in demand among patients made aware of a hospital's superior clinical standards of care.

Romley said it makes sense for patients to consider what a hospital has to offer in terms of services. "Why wouldn't we expect patients to care about the broader experience?" said Romley. "This is a very consumer-oriented culture. It would almost be shocking if patients didn't care about some of these things."

There's no doubt that hospitals are always going to promote quality of care above all other factors when marketing to the local community. But these studies should provide food for thought – no pun intended- when it comes to upgrading meals and other amenities a hospital can offer to patients during their stay.

See Also:

What Disney Can Teach Hospitals About Patient-Centered Care

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1 comments on "Hospitals Offer Amenities to Drive Patient Volume"


jmaranan (3/24/2011 at 1:11 PM)
I just blogged about the very same topic for our website. In comparing one of our centers' patient satisfaction scores with those from 19 NCI-designated cancer centers included in the Press-Ganey Outpatient Oncology Database, none of the scores reflected answers to clinically based questions. Instead, the scores reflected qualitative and experiential activities like valet parking, ease of access and personal experience with the cancer center. However it is measured, it is evident that the patient-centered care model goes well beyond medicine and technology.