Nursing
e-Newsletter
Intelligence Unit Special Reports Special Events Subscribe Sponsored Departments Follow Us

Twitter Facebook LinkedIn RSS

How a 110-Year-Old Hospital Rebranded Itself

Jacqueline Fellows, for HealthLeaders Media, April 9, 2013

Even though 31 beds represents a 10% increase and an opportunity for more patient volume, the hospital decided to keep the old building operational to allow for overflow, which happened during flu season. Since it kept the old building, Children's Hospital Los Angeles is now licensed for 603 beds.

"We wanted to let the greater Southern California community know that this was going to be a different experience than they previously had," says Marshall.

The opening of the new, bigger hospital also launched Children's new logo—a big four-color butterfly with the tagline, "We Treat Kids Better." The look is fresh and fun; a stark departure from the old tagline, "International Leader in Pediatrics."

Marshall says the new logo was developed internally by the creative director and came from a healing garden in the old building.

"You would see butterflies everywhere," she says. "There is a sculpture of a butterfly, and butterfly artwork that was designed by our cancer patients, and a lot of sayings that go along with [the artwork]. The saying that struck him most was 'Butterflies fly and they're free.' That was an important statement from one of our cancer patients and it really served as the creative inspiration for our new logo."

Wanting to weave some of the old logo into the new one, Children's adopted the rainbow color palette.

Documenting the creative process was also an important part of the rebranding campaign, says Marshall, because there were no records explaining how the old logo came to be: a graphical representation of two adult-sized hands reaching up for a child-sized hand amid a backdrop of a rainbow-colored circle. In fact, Marshall says when they started digging through the files, there were too many logos.

"We audited all of the materials and all of the logos that were in use as an institution because, really, it had not been watched for a long period of time," says Marshall. "[As] I shared with the board, we had about 50 different logos in use when I arrived. What that demonstrated to me was… we had degraded our brand awareness, if we had any to begin with."

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Comments are moderated. Please be patient.