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Care Coordination Tough to Define, Measure

Alexandra Wilson Pecci, for HealthLeaders Media, March 4, 2014

And what is the framework, essentially, to the front-line nurses and the safety leaders in the United States?

It's a rubric, a roadmap, if you will, to prioritize the best existing measures of care coordination, and very importantly, to help fill the current measurement gaps in care coordination to get to those robust measures that really gets to the heart of quality care coordination. The framework helps to identify the best concepts for development of new measures of care coordination.

Lamb: If I remember correctly, about 100 nurses participated in that framework. I think that it reflects the importance of care coordination to quality of care as well as patients and families and to the nursing community.

Dailey: It was actually over 200. It was a bi-level professional issues panel that was convened by ANA over six months, and there was a steering committee, [as well as input from experts like Gerri Lamb].

Lamb: As Maureen was saying, care coordination is a priority for the National Quality Strategy, so it's essential that we define it well and measure it for all the reasons that Maureen was talking about… so we know when it's happening, we can capture it, and we have the opportunity to improve it. Care coordination is so central to the patient experience, to families, so that a measurement becomes a really core piece to this.

We're able to say, yes, this is care coordination; it's being done well, and we have the opportunity to improve it. So the framework that Maureen was talking about becomes really important, because care coordination tends to be very abstract for people. They often know it when they see it, but it's difficult to define upfront.

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