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HIT Security Hinges on Mobile Device Management

Scott Mace, for HealthLeaders Media, June 19, 2012

The toolkit looks at legal and regulatory aspects of mobile security in healthcare, and also includes links to a Veterans Administration case study and guidance from Forrester Research, BankInfoSecurity, and others.

Now the workgroup is creating additional resources to reflect how users access content such as videos and podcasts from their mobile devices, Brady says. The goal is provide more examples of policies currently in use, in some cases taking the policies from some health systems and anonymizing them, if that makes the health system in question more comfortable about sharing their best practices.

The biggest challenge the HIMSS committee has to wrestle with is how to deal with devices not owned by the healthcare systems, but brought to work by employees.

"Usually most organizations won't allow the iPad on the network unless it's owned by the organization, then they can have some control over the App Store and iTunes," Brady says. "I know that's an issue at my organization."

My story pointed out the increasing use of virtualized desktops to permit the use of BYOD iPads, but for Brady and others, this alternative isn't a slam-dunk, at least not yet. "Something needs to be in place to verify the end points will not incur risk to the network," he says.

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1 comments on "HIT Security Hinges on Mobile Device Management"


Ann Unitas (6/19/2012 at 4:44 PM)
Scott - You hit the nail on the head. Policies and rules will not keep providers from using whatever tools available to do their jobs effectively, and mobile devices are an essential part of the toolkit. It is clearly not practical to expect all users to tweak configurations on their personal devices, yet that is the only proposed solution I hear much about. Apollo offers an app that lets professionals use their mobile device camera without risking unauthorized use of the picture. It doesn't solve the whole problem - but it addresses the most common, concerning, use of personal devices. Thanks to people like you, we'll get there!