Health Plans
e-Newsletter
Intelligence Unit Special Reports Special Events Subscribe Sponsored Departments Follow Us

Twitter Facebook LinkedIn RSS

CMS Compromise Gives Parkland Reprieve

Margaret Dick Tocknell, for HealthLeaders Media, September 12, 2011

Parkland still faces another follow-up survey to assess the status of other less serious deficiencies, including:

  • Failure to provide 24-hour nursing services
  • Failure to maintain adequate medical records
  • Failure to dispose of expired medications
  • Failure to properly store medical equipment

See also:

 

 


Margaret Dick Tocknell is a reporter/editor with HealthLeaders Media.
Twitter
1 | 2 | 3

Comments are moderated. Please be patient.

2 comments on "CMS Compromise Gives Parkland Reprieve"


Hannibal (9/13/2011 at 3:34 AM)
I think the authors of this article should make it clear that Parkland was indeed terminated from participating in Medicare programs as of Sept. 30 of this month. So, Parkland is the largest hospital in the history of the US to be terminated from Medicare, surpassing the previous title holder, King/Drew in LA. CMS only allowed a compromise for "probationary" terms for Parkland to continue to operate by forcing the hospital into a "service improvement agreement." That compromise occurred because Parkland is the only public hospital serving the Dallas area. If the hospital closed, then there were no other safety net hospitals to pick up the slack. The point is that Parkland was deemed such a bad hospital that it would have closed down, if it wouldn't have caused a catastophic collapse of public health services in Dallas.

Doug Keiller (9/12/2011 at 3:03 PM)
Public hospitals serving large Latino populations (Dallas, Houston, LA, Chicago, Phoenix, etc.) are a critical public resources, but face huge operating challenges. One cost-effective strategy the CMS-approved consultants should explore is improving ER and OB operating efficiency by training and sourcing more fully bilingual staff. Currently, a large portion of patient conversations require interpretation, which slows service delivery by up to 50%. Bilingual staff (RNs, etc.) have been shown to triage ER patients faster, for example, reducing wait times, and improving initial assessment accuracy. In OB, speeding patient communication with bilingual staff can free up time to focus on infection control and other safety procedures.