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Wellness Initiatives Are Going Down the Drain

Chelsea Rice, for HealthLeaders Media, June 3, 2013

Sebelius Shares Work-Life Balance Strategies

Responsible for implementing one of the most complicated and politically incendiary pieces of American legislation in decades, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius has a lot on her plate.

As the head of the federal branch that oversees the $17 billion healthcare industry, Sebelius landed the number 25 spot on Forbes's 2013 list of The World's 100 Most Powerful Women and is the 68th most powerful person in the world.

In the Forbes interview, Sebelius, a former state governor, offers glimpses into how she manages to balance the demands of her work with her desire for a fulfilling family and personal life.

"Finding a balanced situation, even for young women and whether you have kids or not, tends to be all the more important for women. Because not only does it make sense to find a balance that allows you to perform the best work, but also it is a way you're judged in the workplace differently than your male colleagues," says Sebelius.

With the most powerful person in the world as her boss, she says the keys to striking that harmonic chord between stressful job and fulfilling family life are finding, and keeping, a supportive spouse and friends. She also recommends making time for things in your life that calm you down and "center" you.

"Find that way to put yourself at peace and being able to say I've done enough for today, I'm going to go to sleep, wake up tomorrow, and start all over again. Because if you don't do that, it's pretty easy to drive yourself crazy right away," she says.


Chelsea Rice is an associate editor for HealthLeaders Media.
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1 comments on "Wellness Initiatives Are Going Down the Drain"


TB (6/5/2013 at 2:38 PM)
Why is it surprising that docs are least likely to wash their hands? Many physicians continue to ignore medical research, relying more on their intuition in providing care than science