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Employers Behaving Badly

Chelsea Rice, for HealthLeaders Media, August 26, 2013

Employees reported that phones were set up in an on-site basement to monitor the physician's telephone calls. "Former IT employees confirmed they set up phones to record telephone conversations of a BMH doctor and his staff," reads the report. "Several individuals stated that, in their opinion, the former IT Director received direction to set up the phones from upper management at BMH."

No recordings have surfaced, but the report says the former IT director delivered the recordings to hospital administration, who deny ever receiving them.

The Idaho attorney general amended the grand jury's original charges to a misdemeanor, and Kraml entered a plea of guilty, the AG's office said in a statement. The CEO was fined $1,000 and has been sentenced to probation and 100 hours of community service. Two of the IT employees were presumed innocent on the grounds they were acting on instructions from their superiors. One IT employee has a warrant for his arrest as he never showed up in court.

According to The Teton Valley News, the hospital board plans to hire an ethics officer to proactively plan against future issues, and no one is to be fired or reprimanded. The hospital spokesperson said policies will be more closely "refined."

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1 comments on "Employers Behaving Badly"


Don Stumpp (8/28/2013 at 1:35 PM)
I don't perceive the UPS move as negative or an employer behaving badly. It is what needs to happen. The current situation is another 'cost-shift' that needs to be eliminated. Why does UPS need to pay for health coverage of a spouse who works at Denny's or some employer who skates by without offering insurance? Don't most dual-income families go through the math to determine whether their insurance should be through the husband or wife? An employer will pick up new covered lives as your employee spouse gets offloaded by the other employer. I contend it's a good thing. The US has chosen employer-based coverage, so employers should not take care of other employer's employees! It's that simple.