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Could Retiring Physicians Solve the Primary Care Shortage?

Chelsea Rice, for HealthLeaders Media, September 9, 2013

Glass enlisted the help of professional connections he's made over the years at the UC San Diego School of Medicine to help him build the curriculum and find the faculty for the program. Professors David Emil Joseph Bazzo, MD, and William Norcross, MD, at UC San Diego's Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, were instrumental.

Bazzo and Norcross are both nationally recognized for their work at the UCSD's Physician Assessment and Clinical Education Program (PACE), which retrains physicians whose licenses have been jeopardized by behavioral issues. They are joined by ten additional family physician faculty members from UCSD School of Medicine, who are available for student inquiries and questions throughout the course.

Glass says students can complete the course in four or five months, if they dedicate four hours a day, five days a week to the material and exam work. But students are allowed a year to complete the course.

The cost for the program is a steal at $7,500, compared to medical schools that offer similar options for the $20,000 range. Plus, the convenience of the online coursework, and the ability to set an individual pace, appeals to the retiring physician, says Glass.

Part of the program's career-matching program will pay employers to regularly evaluate PRR graduates, so the team will receive regular feedback on the effectiveness of their primary care education.

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2 comments on "Could Retiring Physicians Solve the Primary Care Shortage?"


Sasha (9/13/2013 at 6:51 AM)
Thanks for sharing.

Neha Marfatia (9/11/2013 at 9:49 PM)
I am a 39 yo mother and physician. I stopped working approximately 7 years ago to raise my young children. My youngest is now school age and I would like to work part time as a primary care physician. (I trained as an internist and did one year of family medicine before that). Do you think I should and could do this program? It sounds very intriguing to me. I live in San Francisco.