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Bedside Initiatives Aren't Just for Kids

Alexandra Wilson Pecci, for HealthLeaders Media, September 3, 2013

"We really start from the premise that in many ways it's the patients right to have someone with them, and we believe that it really improves the care," Walton says. "Family presence is certainly a comfort measure, but it's definitely about patient safety and quality of care."

For example, Walton says a family presence keeps patients safer during handoffs because someone who intimately knows the patient has been monitoring and observing him or her.

"We see them through the clinical lens," Walton says. "A family member knows them in a different way."

Walton says that HUP is always developing programs to make patients and families feel cared for and comforted. For instance, HUP sponsors coffee hours for families in the patient education center and is developing a place where family members can take a shower. And many of these programs are developed and/or led by nurses.

"It's trying to view the experience from the patient/family perspective," Walton says. "Everyone is vulnerable when they're sick, when they're in pain, or in major health crisis—not just children."

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1 comments on "Bedside Initiatives Aren't Just for Kids"


Robanai Disque (9/6/2013 at 12:45 PM)
I am all for kids and adults not being afraid to go to the doctor?hospital and for it to be a good experience. My question is how many kids who don't have insurance could have been taken care of with the cost of musical stairs? How many fish tanks (which have to be maintained),gadgets etc.Were any of the items donated, do volunteers maintain the fish tanks and equipment? Sometimes as Americans we set the bar high,then keep raising it and when is enough, enough? My children both had birth defects and went to a speciality pediatric hospital and they were perfectly happen with the large doll house that was donated by someone who made it and educational toys in a toy box.One of my children continued to go for 18 years to that hospital.