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OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Training Mandatory for Physicians

David LaHoda, for HealthLeaders Media, October 26, 2010

Here are some tips on creating a smooth-running physician bloodborne pathogen training program:

Before the physician training dilemma rears its head again, work on creating a positive pecking order.
• Remind physicians about maintaining a culture of safety and being a safety role model for nonphysical staff.
• Work toward creating a training program that provides knowledge-based content, uses an engaging method of delivery, and allows for one-on-one reinforcement.
• Take time to explain the nuances of being a physician practice owner while at the same time being regarded as an employee subject to OSHA compliance.
• Caution that noncompliance as owner and/or employee on initial and annual training could have financial consequences to the practice in the form of OSHA fines.
Having accomplished that, now focus on getting physician signatures on the training sheet.

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2 comments on "OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Training Mandatory for Physicians"


David LaHoda (10/28/2010 at 1:56 PM)
I disagree with the above comment. Some highly educated healthcare workers either never had good or recent training in protection from bloodborne pathogens or have forgotten it. For example see "Notes from the field: YUCK! You got PUS, WHERE? (Here's the address http://blogs.hcpro.com/osha/2009/08/notes-from-the-field-yuck-you-got-pus-where/) and tell me that the doctor in that post couldn't use a refresher course in bloodborne pathogens safety. As for the baseball analogy...have you seen how poorly major leaguers are in the fundamentals of the game? Emphasizing the basics, especially when it concerns in health and safety in the workplace is usually a good idea.

JB (10/27/2010 at 7:11 PM)
I am no physician, but I'm as perplexed as they must be. I'm in the safety industry and I understand how OSHA's requirements are the same for everybody but sometimes they completely lack common sense. This makes about as much sense as making it mandatory that professional baseball players participate in "how to throw a baseball" training every year.