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Don't Count on SGR Reform This Year

Joe Cantlupe, for HealthLeaders Media, May 31, 2012

Instead, Cantor mentions what the GOP may tackle if the Supreme Court overturns President Obama's healthcare reform. The court is expected to consider challenges to the law sometime in June. 

"Independence Day to August, Americans will rightly be focused on the effects of the Supreme Court's ObamaCare decision when we return from July Fourth," Cantor writes. "Although we do not know how the court will rule, we are prepared to move forward to ensure that the whole unworkable law is fully reported."

"We have a busy legislative agenda planned this summer and our schedule will undoubtedly require further additions," Cantor adds. "I hope this memo provides you and your constituents with an outline of our pro growth plans for the months ahead."

Obviously, Cantor's agenda is not set in stone, nor is it reflective of what the House may do, although 240 Republicans and 190 Democrats are seated in this legislative session. But it does give an idea that the SGR is not a key consideration. "Hey," one healthcare organization official told me about Cantor's letter, "it's politics."

Payment reform requires flexibility
The House Ways and Means Committee's letter to physician groups, however, makes it seem that the committee is serious about looking into changes around the SGR, but offered no timetable as to when it would act.

The House letter invited physician groups to look into various financial issues faced by doctors, as well as organizational alignment strategies.

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1 comments on "Don't Count on SGR Reform This Year"


DonS (5/31/2012 at 2:50 PM)
Another consideration for SGR repeal or at least bringing in stability to the Medicare PFS for 2013 and 2014 is the Medicaid parity component mandated under PPACA. And that, of course, is assuming the PPACA is still there come January 2013. But if state's Medicaid programs must pay Medicare rates to primary care on E&M codes in January 2013, Congress can't be diddling around with SGR cuts, patches, fixes, or other nonsense into 2013 like they did in 2010.