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Disney Applies Technology to Improve Patient Experience

Gienna Shaw, for HealthLeaders Media, July 11, 2011

The center, in part with the help of its foundation, made a hefty investment in the high-tech/high-touch strategy. The organization's leaders, from board members to clinical leaders to the c-suite--agreed that if they were to make patient experience a top priority, the investment was mission-critical, Lowe says.

"The building itself was a $65 million building. And the hardware—basic plumbing stuff—was easy. The experience part was really expensive … It’s on order of $150,000 to $200,000 per room. So it’s not trivial money,” Lowe says. "When you have a name like Disney with your own brand on top of it … people just expect it’s going to be premier … The expectations of delivery of quality of care and of the experience is set. I believe we meet it. That’s why it’s so transformational what we’ve done here.”

See Also:
What Disney Can Teach Hospitals About Patient-Centered Care

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4 comments on "Disney Applies Technology to Improve Patient Experience"


Kevin F. Callahan, MHA (7/14/2011 at 9:33 AM)
Even without the soothing lights and swaying palm trees, this type of technology facilitates smooth patient flow, the reduction of bottlenecks and lowers the likelihood of medical errors. That in and of itself is enough reason to strongly consider implementation.

Mark Darvill (7/13/2011 at 5:54 PM)
The issue that concerns me is less about going from "basic quality medical care" to "carnival atmosphere medical care", rather it is about self-serving and self-deceiving assumption that the patient already receives basic quality medical care. Quality, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder.

Kristin Baird, RN, BSN, MHA (7/12/2011 at 3:08 PM)
Kudos for the innovative spirit! I love the out-of-the-box thinking that marries technology to the patient experience. Yes, it is not an inexpensive proposition, but I for one am always glad to see opportunities for improving the patient experience. It's not something that everyone can afford to implement, but innovation always begins by asking ourselves, "What if..."