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4 in 10 Healthcare Execs Dissatisfied with EHRs

Lena J. Weiner, for HealthLeaders Media, June 3, 2014

O'Rourke also cites the expense of EHR implementations, the continual need for system upgrades, and concerns around data security as other frustrations attendant to EHRs.

Survey respondents cited as the second most commonly area for capital investment acquisition of clinical equipment, including surgical, imaging and lab equipment, which was cited by more than 20 percent of all respondents.

Other trends mentioned in the survey included widely reported primary care physician shortages (indicated by four out of five respondents) and a jump in provider consolidation, which is now reported by one in every four respondents.

Survey respondents comprised 127 hospital and health system e CEOs, CFOs and COOs. One hundred and twelve organizations of various sizes and types across 32 states were represented.


Lena Weiner is an Associate Editor at HealthLeaders Media.
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2 comments on "4 in 10 Healthcare Execs Dissatisfied with EHRs"


Tim Pansare (6/20/2014 at 9:49 AM)
Many providers have chosen an EHR and are now unhappy with their choice. Multiple reasons can lead to that situation. First, doctors might not have purchased the right product, for a variety of reasons. For example, they might have outside influences to purchase a specific product which might not be a right choice as per their clinical specialty or as per their workflow . Second, physicians might not be completely engaged in the [INVALID]ion of the product. And third, in some cases, doctors buy the right product but they are just not using it effectively. The bottom line is, providers who are making the decision about which EHR to buy have to realize how profoundly the decision will affect all aspects of the practice. As a national EHR company, many times we have to customize the system from a workflow perspective. EHR vendors should also emphasize on providing adequate training to clinical staff as lack of training is another reason why physicians may dislike the EHR.

bennett (6/6/2014 at 11:26 AM)
The other "ility" out there is Usability. Many EHR vendors still have an 'engineering-centric' development process that leads to high training costs and unsatisfied users. Some current EHRs are like the first HP calculators. Scientists loved them, but people like you and me thought that they were 'goofy' mainly because they didn't match our mental model of how to do math. Engineering-centric EHRs, for example, have vital signs for entry presented in alphabetical order ( Systolic near the bottom of a scrollable list - diastolic near the top) -making entry of something as simple as a blood pressure way more complex than necessary. User-centered Design is the way to go - Google it!