Health Plans
e-Newsletter
Intelligence Unit Special Reports Special Events Subscribe Sponsored Departments Follow Us

Twitter Facebook LinkedIn RSS

5 Ways to Energize Your Patient Experience Strategy

Margaret Dick Tocknell, for HealthLeaders Media, April 27, 2011

4. Get everyone engaged

One of his clients told Wolf that the key to their success was helping staff rediscover the passion that brought them to healthcare in the first place – care and service to others. It’s a simple message that resonates across departments and job titles. Cold hard cash can motivate, too. About 60% of the survey respondents said patient experience efforts are tied to individual performance reviews and bonuses.

5. It takes relentless commitment and continuous action.

The current thinking is that there is a ‘there’ that you get to with the patient experience. Wolf says there is not a ‘there.’ Improving the patient experience take continuous effort and relentless commitment by everyone. Hospitals want to get to a point where improving the patient experience isn’t a goal, it is simply the nature of the organization.

With federal payments tied to results, patient experience is more important than ever, HealthLeaders Media Industry Survey 2011 confirms.


Margaret Dick Tocknell is a reporter/editor with HealthLeaders Media.
Twitter
1 | 2 | 3

Comments are moderated. Please be patient.

6 comments on "5 Ways to Energize Your Patient Experience Strategy"


R Daniel King (5/6/2011 at 5:32 PM)
The patient experience is a product of the employee experience which is the product of leadership. If leadership is not engaged, and most are NOT, then employees are professionally dysfunctional and the patient experience becomes a statistic in the quality chasm the Institute of Medicince identifies every 10 years.

Mary K Parker (5/3/2011 at 2:10 PM)
I think the 5 points could almost be boiled down to one word: Communicate. As far as point 4, cold hard cash is a motivator only to a certain point and it won't sustain improvement. "Drive," by Dan Pink will bear this out.

Jake Poore (5/2/2011 at 9:55 AM)
Terrific points, Jason. I also agree with Kristin's points, amenities and concierge are a nice value-add, but my patient focus groups very rarely discuss the lack of hotel like homeyness, rather they always reference the lack of consistency between care team members. Having an explicit culture where every team member knows how to express in words and actions what compassion, courtesy, and dignity looks like, sounds like and feels like to those in need...now that would be world class.