Community Hospitals
e-Newsletter
Intelligence Unit Special Reports Special Events Subscribe Sponsored Departments Follow Us

Twitter Facebook LinkedIn RSS

CHF Readmission Prevention Efforts Costly for Hospital

Cheryl Clark, for HealthLeaders Media, July 27, 2011

Stauffer said in the interview that Medicare non-payment policies in the event of an adverse event, such as a hospital-acquired infection, during that readmission would not make that much difference in the overall financial equation.

In the same issue of the journal, further evidence that readmissions prevention programs work was provided in another paper by Rachel Voss and colleagues of Quality Partners of Rhode Island and Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence.

Their report validated another model of readmission prevention effort, the Care Transitions Intervention or CTI, with 257 patients at six Rhode Island hospitals. That effort reduced readmissions by 36% compared with a control group.

However, that program met with challenges because just over half of those approached agreed to participate, and some resisted a home visit.

See Also:
Low Health Literacy Linked to Mortality in CHF Patients
CHF Patients May Fare Better, Pay More at High-Volume Hospitals
12 Ways to Reduce Hospital Readmissions
$50 Blood Test Could Predict CHF Readmission Risk


Cheryl Clark is senior quality editor and California correspondent for HealthLeaders Media. She is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists.
Twitter
1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Comments are moderated. Please be patient.

1 comments on "CHF Readmission Prevention Efforts Costly for Hospital"


gcgeraci (7/28/2011 at 1:11 PM)
Was any analysis done to see if there were any cost differences between providers- and any providers that provided care below the Medicare DRG payment (with equal or better quality?) There are often wide profiles for similar diagnoses in terms of cost of care, and if a best practice can be identified or created that keeps the costs lower at equal or better quality, that may be a more effective strategy for the hospital in the short run.