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Supreme Court Can't Stop Healthcare Reform

Philip Betbeze, for HealthLeaders Media, March 30, 2012

I think most hospital executive leaders are keeping their head down on this. I don't mean to minimize the impact of this decision. Yes, they're following the decision, because it could cause a crisis in healthcare. Many variables will be thrown back into the mix if the law is gutted, but the new goal will not change.

Whoever is paying for healthcare is tired, and in many cases unable, to subsidize the old status quo of volume being the key success factor for healthcare businesses. They can't, or won't, suffer double-digit premium increases anymore and they won't write blank checks to “do stuff” to the patients they cover.

Instead, many healthcare executives know that they have to figure out how to work with their partners to absorb some of that risk. This would have sounded absolutely insane around the time PPACA was first being debated, but those partners now include the employer, the patient, the health plan, the physician, and many others in allied care. All will share risk. The multiple pilot programs going on across the country with almost every payer is evidence of that.

The problems a rejection of the legislation will cause will be severe, but it won't change the work you need to be doing.

In fact, it will make delivering on value even more important.

See Also:
Regardless of Court Ruling, Reform Under Way

ACA's Fate Rests with Court

 


Philip Betbeze is senior leadership editor with HealthLeaders Media.
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2 comments on "Supreme Court Can't Stop Healthcare Reform"


Debbi (4/1/2012 at 12:42 PM)
Perhaps after the SCOTUS' decision to throw out the unconstitutional mandate, informed and concerned citizens including healthcare industry executives, will begin to have a rational discussion again. When the current Administration's agenda to take over 1/3rd of the U.S. economy is thwarted, sanity may come back in style.

gary (3/30/2012 at 2:00 PM)
The timing of the SCOTUS taking up, and deciding on this issue couldn't have been worse - with an election looming in Nov. Regardless of what the Court "decides", what is likely to ensue is a steady drone of ignorance-based and/or self-serving fear mongering dominated by mouth-pieces from both extremes. If you thought the so called 'healthcare debate' has been devolved into petty political circus thus far, just wait - it's about to get worse.