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Best Hospital Websites Put Patients First

Marianne Aiello, for HealthLeaders Media, March 28, 2012

Reveling in the results
When St. Helena’s new site launched in June 2011 it had reached its administration’s main goals of creating a visually attractive site that engages visitors in a patient-focused and intuitive experience for all three campuses, Cowan says.

"In addition to allowing a more traditional navigation by hospital service, our site allows patients to browse conditions and treatment and then to learn more about what we offer and which providers are available to that service locally," Cowan said. "The new approach is much more patient friendly."

Both St. Helena’s page rankings and the volume of site visits have improved, with the majority of patient users visiting several service line-specific microsites.

"Those sites get the majority of the patient visits and rank quite well on the search sites based on more targeted keywords," Cowan said. "Featuring these service-specific micro-sites and landing pages remains important so that visitors can have the experience they are seeking rather than receiving the broad range of messages available on our core site."

This week, take some time to view your site from the eyes of a patient. Make a list of 10 or so basic items that a patient should be able to find from your homepage in one or two clicks. You may find it harder than you’d think.

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1 comments on "Best Hospital Websites Put Patients First"


Bill Sterzenbach (2/6/2013 at 9:54 AM)
Sometimes it makes sense to hide the milk. In fact, there is a very good reason why it's not by the register. When determining the architecture for your site, you need to determine which items need to be by the register and which should be in the back aisle. Too often, health-related websites make info TOO accessible - sometimes a visitor SHOULD be required to learn a bit before getting to "the goodies". For example, a few pages on the risks and costs wedged between a marketing piece on robotics and the "contact us about robotics options" page.