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5 Social Media Resolutions for Hospitals

Marianne Aiello, for HealthLeaders Media, January 9, 2013

4.Keep an eye on your peers
The healthcare industry as a whole is behind the curve, but many hospitals are true social media standouts. Keep an eye on these organizations to see how they launch campaigns, respond to criticism, and deal with employees.

The Mayo Clinic tops the list of social media trailblazers and provides helpful information to other organizations through its Center for Social Media.

UPMC is also a top organization to go to for social media tips, especially it's well maintained Facebook page.

And if you're looking for Twitter inspiration, check out Brigham and Women's account. They tweet a variety of posts on anything from health topics to hospital rankings to volunteer opportunities.

5.Track everything
None of this counts if you can't view the statistics that tell you which efforts are working, which fell flat, which are tapering off, and which have found a second life. Keep count of your followers and likes, of how many people clicked your links, of how long visitors stayed on that blog post.

This information will help you better tailor future social campaigns and give you solid numbers to report to your superiors.

With these five resolutions, hospital marketers should be able to commit to having a strong presence in the social media world now and for years to come—or at least until the millennium gets its braces off.

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2 comments on "5 Social Media Resolutions for Hospitals"


Ryan Squire (1/9/2013 at 5:15 PM)
Please review your article and advice that hospitals should have employees sign a form indicating that they will not share negative comments about the organization. There is a growing body of evidence that this practice is illegal and in violation of the National Labor Relations Act. Several decisions by courts and the National labor Relations Board have indicated that employers must have a policy and practice that protects employees' rights to discuss wages, hours, and working conditions; regardless of whether those discussions are negative. Here is a link to the NLRB report on social media: http://www.nlrb.gov/news/acting-general-counsel-releases-report-employer-social-media-policies

Stephen Moegling (1/9/2013 at 2:13 PM)
Excellent article and very inspirational. Though a small percentage of systems are using social media, fewer are using it effectively to contribute to the organization's business goals. One reason for this is the silo approach systems have taken with social [INVALID] branding over here, event marketing over there, and social does its thing in a kind of communications limbo. I posted a New Year's Resolutions blog for healthcare marketers that you may find relevant, especially Resolution #4: http://gojunto.com/healthcare-marketing-new-years-resolutions/