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Disruptive Nurses Lead to Better Outcomes

Alexandra Wilson Pecci, for HealthLeaders Media, October 15, 2013

Rising has realized that many health systems just aren't ready for that kind of change; change that's truly disruptive. That's why she's working not only to promote Centering, but also to change health systems.

For example, she says that "systems are very entrenched. Care is given in exam rooms individually… The exam room is the property of the agency… then when the provider goes into the room, it's the provider's space. It isn't a space that patients feel that they own."

Rising believes the time is right for disruption, especially with the relatively new emphasis placed on patient satisfaction, patient engagement, and patient-centered medical homes.

"It is a good time for us, I think, to have an alternative to individual care," Rising says. "We have to rethink how care is provided. We just have to do it. There's opportunity for change."


Alexandra Wilson Pecci is a managing editor for HealthLeaders Media.

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1 comments on "Disruptive Nurses Lead to Better Outcomes"


Chris (10/17/2013 at 1:36 AM)
I read the article and still apply my personal philosophy that conclusions are derived applying current knowledge and experience from an individual's perspective. A statement might be correct if applying current knowledge, but consider not only if such knowledge is verifiable with EBP, but does that knowledge encompass all aspects and variables? An RN might view changes as disruptive, concurrently, administration might see the whole picture with a positive outlook. I disagree with the article almost entirely, being disruptive may be subjective based on those perceiving the disruption, but from my limited experience disruption does not promote harmonious productivity toward any goal. Forget ripping the box to shreds, that is destructive....instead comply with ANA/State Board rules, and view the box as a dynamic cube. I would also question those that built the initial box if it had to be ripped. Perhaps those that are disruptive do not posses the spatial or critical thinking abilities to properly utilize available resources, not realize the availability of them or the long-term consequences. I do agree with the intended result positive deviants have, as I challenge everything everywhere in every aspect within my Scope of Practice. Achieving a goal more efficiently or effectively can be tested with theoretical simulations and algorithms or apply multiple PDSA cycles to eliminate all variables to achieve end result. Change may be disruptive or viewed as such if the implementation of it and relevant variables are not considered. I am very motivated and passionate to promote excellent and efficient health in every aspect, yet rationally inquisitive to seek opportunities for safe effective changes. By disagreeing with the article might I be perceived as disruptive or courageous?