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Mandatory Use of CPOE Prevents Blood Clots

Cheryl Clark, for HealthLeaders Media, October 16, 2012

The order set also revealed that low molecular-weight heparin rather than unfractionated heparin was the preferred drug for most patients who did not have a risk of bleeding as a contraindication.

The authors say that in factoring cost, the biggest expense is in implementation of an electronic health record system. But after that, "specific VTE prophylaxis algorithms for different patient populations would result in a relatively small incremental cost." The study looked at adult trauma patients treated between January, 2007 and December, 2010.

They concluded that "although many types of interventions have attempted to increase the use of prophylaxis, our proactive, mandatory approach has been shown to be one of the most effective.  More passive strategies, such as laminated cards or educational efforts...were found to be relatively ineffective in increasing prophylaxis compliance rates."


Cheryl Clark is senior quality editor and California correspondent for HealthLeaders Media. She is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists.
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3 comments on "Mandatory Use of CPOE Prevents Blood Clots"


Todd (10/17/2012 at 5:40 PM)
Funny. Many JCI accredited hospitals like Severence and Bumrungrad have fully integrated CPOE systems yet US hospitals generally don't putting patients at greater risk.

Toni Alcott (10/17/2012 at 12:03 PM)
I would like to see physician's better educated on treatment of blood clots to prevent them from becoming fatal. I had a terrible experience With 3 blood clots, DVT and a PE because of a physician being stubborn and not taking action soon enough when two other physician's had consulted with him on this and he still would not listen.

jain (10/16/2012 at 1:18 PM)
i would like to think that my doctor is good enough he wouldn't overlook just an important aspect of my care.