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Who's Being Transparent With HAC Data?

Cheryl Clark, for HealthLeaders Media, April 14, 2011

Linda Greene, director of infection prevention at Rochester General Hospital in New York and a member of the board of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control, also says more hospitals are being more proactive, getting cultures on more patients upon admission so they can avoid getting blame for infections the patients brought with them.

"People are understandably worried about [the] preciseness of this documentation of whether something was coded as present on admission or not," she says.

The spreadsheet, which will eventually be transferred to an easier-to -decipher forma, allows users to compare individual hospitals with national averages for each category:

Falls and hospital trauma—10,564 or .564 per 1,000 eligible discharges

• Vascular catheter-associated infections—6,868 or .367 per 1,000 eligible discharges

Catheter-associated urinary tract infections—5,928 or .316 per 1,000 eligible discharges

Stage III or IV pressure ulcers—2,521 or .135 per 1,000 eligible discharges

• Poor glycemic control—944 or .05 per 1,000 eligible discharges
• Retained surgical objects—484 or .09 per 1,000 eligible discharges
• Complications from an air embolism—53 or .003 per 1,000 eligible discharges
• Incompatible blood transfusions—23 or .001 per 1,000 eligible discharges.

Eventually, the numbers, which reflect discharges between Oct. 1, 2008 and July 1, 2010, will be available with other quality measures posted on Hospital Compare. Until then, the spreadsheet can be downloaded here.

 

Cheryl Clark is senior quality editor and California correspondent for HealthLeaders Media. She is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists.
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