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Mammography Screening Debate Reignites

Cheryl Clark, for HealthLeaders Media, August 29, 2011

Interviewed by phone, Stamatia Destounis, MD, managing partner of the Elizabeth Wende Breast Care in Rochester, NY, said she agrees with Kopans. "We can't live in that world where Dr. Jorgenson lives. The problem is that these early cancers, if left in the breast, no one knows the magical time they can turn into invasive cancer, or that they won't become a bigger or life-threatening problem down the line."

Destounis, a fellow with the American College of Radiology, said that to radiologists and clinicians, "The abnormality that may kill looks the same as the one that may wax and wane and do very little for years."

"We think mammography has helped reducing mortality by finding these small breast cancers that are very treatable," she said.


Cheryl Clark is senior quality editor and California correspondent for HealthLeaders Media. She is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists.
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3 comments on "Mammography Screening Debate Reignites"


John D. Keen MD (9/7/2011 at 8:57 AM)
Dr. Destounis: Please read our article more carefully in Radiology. You are misrepresenting our position. Overdiagnosis turns healthy women into cancer patients, because all detected cancers are treated. We are not advocating watchful waiting as you imply-we advocate that women be told the truth about the problem of overdiagnosis. Let us have an honest debate. John D. Keen, MD

mbrandt2977 (8/29/2011 at 2:27 PM)
My mother was recently diagnosed with Breast Cancer through a mamogram that was clear last year. The cancer is the size of a pea and would not have been felt until it is much more advanced. At 45, I will continue to get my annual mammogram!

linda (8/29/2011 at 9:16 AM)
As a 13 year breast cancer survivor I attribute my survival to early detection and mammography. Many of the women in my Breast Cancer Support group would not have survived if mammograms were not available. I believe the benefit far outweighs the risk. Ask any of us who have survived the horrible disease.