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ONC Takes on Patient Engagement in HIT

Gienna Shaw, for HealthLeaders Media, October 6, 2011

In addition, too many organizations are still using paper-based consent forms. And even those organizations cited as being ahead of the e-consent curve aren't doing enough, ONC says.

"The efforts by the VA to adopt an electronic consent system are frequently cited, and evaluation to date indicates the value of developing such a system. However, the VA’s system and many other systems in use today are primarily being applied with respect to consent for health procedures or treatment and not for electronic health information exchange. It will be important to address the unique challenges of collecting and tracking patient choice regarding sharing their health information in an electronic environment, where information exchanged between health care providers must indicate a patient’s meaningful, informed choice and enable the patient choice to be honored."

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2 comments on "ONC Takes on Patient Engagement in HIT"


Barbara Wilson (10/7/2011 at 1:33 PM)
Thank you, Naomi. Well said and very true.

Naomi Giroux (10/7/2011 at 10:15 AM)
I have two points to make. First is a review of how HIPPA Regulations are being used to keep patients and their families out of the center of information and decision making. Often as patients and their advocates/caregivers try to get enough information to make decisions they are stonewalled. Electronic records could be used as yet another barrier for consumers. Second, I'd suggest more review of the studies about the lack of information sharing be conducted based on your statement. "There is little research as to whether patients are adequately informed to understand the choices they make with respect to sharing health information, ONC says, while studies show that efforts to collect informed consent for treatment from patients are often inadequate and have little educational value."