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Proposed MU Rules Draw Strong Reaction

Margaret Dick Tocknell, for HealthLeaders Media, May 9, 2012

American Medical Association (AMA) and 98 state and specialty medical societies:
The AMA sides with the AHA in terms of meeting a requirement for online access to patient health information. The 10% requirement "unfairly predicates the physician's success for meeting the measure on patient compliance and should be eliminated."

For Stage 2, CMS proposes that 50% of all unique patients seen by the physician be provided online access to their health information within four business days after the information is available to the physician. The AMA would like the threshold requirement to be 20% not 50%. AMA contends that the four-day timeframe is "inconsistent with the HIPAA."

It notes that for Stage 2, CMS proposes that the reporting period be the entire calendar year. "The sheer volume of patient information that has to be made available within four business days for the entire calendar year would be extraordinary for most practices and their staff to manage."

The AMA opposes back-dating of the MU penalty program, or for that matter, any other quality or health IT penalty program, including e-prescribing and PQRS. "If Congress intended that these penalty programs be back-dated, the legislation would have stated so. CMS is essentially pushing up deadlines for participation by a full year or more due largely to its own data processing limitations." The AMA asks CMS to allow physicians to successfully meet Stage 2 MU measures for 90 consecutive days during the first six months of 2015 to avoid the 2015 penalty. It says the process should be extended to 2016 and 2017.

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1 comments on "Proposed MU Rules Draw Strong Reaction"


Jim (5/9/2012 at 10:21 AM)
It seems to me that patient access to records should be via an HIE. The HIE should be able to aggregate records from all providers and provide a single consistent point of access for the patient. Also, if a large percentage of patients are going to access their records on-line how many people will we need to hire to man a help desk to reset credentials, provide help, and I can only imaging the number of questions in interpreting the results. Now, this may be a good thing for some patients, but it is going to be expensive and will certainly expose many patients PHI to the wrong parties.