Survey Data Paint Picture of PCMH Docs

MedPage Today, February 17, 2017

A pattern of higher performance or availability of PCMH-related functions was observed among physicians in PCMH practices compared with physicians in non-PCMH practices, regardless of practice size.

This article first appeared February 17, 2017 on MedPage Today.

By Alexandria Bachert

Nearly 20% of U.S. primary care physicians in 2013 were in practices certified as patient-centered medical homes (PCMH), a comprehensive care delivery model which provides team-based care for all patients, CDC researchers found.

Having at least one physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or certified nurse midwife on staff was more common among office-based primary care physicians (PCPs) in PCMH practices (68.8%) compared with those in non-PCMH practices (47.7%), reported CDC statistician Esther Hing, MPH, and colleagues in a report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

Specifically, more PCPs in PCMH practices had physician assistants and nurse practitioners on staff compared with PCPs in non-PCMH practices (31.3% versus 19.9% and 45.8% versus 27.7%, respectively).

Not surprisingly, a general pattern of higher performance or availability of PCMH-related functions was observed among physicians in PCMH practices compared with physicians in non-PCMH practices, regardless of practice size, noted Hing and colleagues.

When asked for comment on the findings, NCHS public affairs specialist Brian Tsai explained to MedPage Today that "the PCMH has been advocated by primary care physicians, other primary care providers and associated professional societies for decades."

Facebook icon
LinkedIn icon
Twitter icon