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Medical Errors Stubbornly Common, Studies Find



Eleven years after a major study revealed medical errors to be widespread and deadly, the results from two recent studies indicate that the nation's hospitals have not significantly reduced rates of errors, which still lead to tens of thousands of deaths each year.



3 comments on "Medical Errors Stubbornly Common, Studies Find"
Dev Raheja (12/9/2010 at 8:04 PM)

I agrre that medical errors are stubbornly common. The bad news is that they are going to remain common for a long time. First, there is a lack of competion because competitors copy each othere in the name of practicing evidence based medicine. There are many other excuses. I have covered them in my new book "Safer Hospital Care."
Shea Steinberg (12/6/2010 at 1:46 PM)

With the ARRA HITECH Stimulus, I believe a portion of these common medical errors will soon dissipate as more medical providers are encouraged to use <a href="http://www.practicefusion.com?utm_source=comment&utm_medium=blog&utm_campaign=PFLS">electronic health records</a> . Paper records are one of the reasons why so many patients are misdiagnosed and why there are so many medical errors. We can easily erase those errors by going digital. -Shea Steinberg Jr. Social Media Specialist
kit (12/6/2010 at 12:25 PM)

Please provide input If my data is incorrect. *The aggregate work showed that the majority of errors were not life threatening. * Inconsistent staffing patterns which may contribute to morbidity & mortality. For instance GME laws have increased the number of junior MD handing information off. Furthermore, even the Magnet hospitals haven't kept pace with NNU nursing ratios. Moreover, there is no clear work advantages found in these facilities. Finally, we have no survey data to show us that senior nursing staff will stay in high acuity units. In fact, there is some anecdotal data showing the converse. * Finally, many hospitals contain patients for end of life (EOL) care. Including these EOL patients in your data will increase the adverse events significantly.