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Does E-Health Stand a Remote Chance?



As technology advances and costs fall, the use of telemedicine expands, but obstacles to achieving e-health success remain.



2 comments on "Does E-Health Stand a Remote Chance?"
Sherif E Issa (2/17/2011 at 5:58 AM)

I think at this stage; m-health or Tele-medicine succeeds better when presented as simple, mostly SMS based applications. A reminder to take your medication, or vaccination, or follow-up with pregnant women are some examples. These tools are very well accepted in developed and developing communities alike. But for more complex, fully fledged Tele-medicine applications, I can speak from my experience here in Egypt where we launched a 'Tele-Derma' project. Dermatology was an ideal candidate due to its highly visual nature.... several major entities collaborated to make this project a success – and it was – but only from a technical point. Pictures were taken, data logged in, information sent to experts and a full diagnosis + prescription was sent back.. all through broad band mobile technology; so it worked like a charm. Expert doctors were even more able to organized their schedules better, that was a bonus. On the human level however nor doctors or patients wanted to lose the 'personal' touch they enjoyed for years... some patients actually preferred to go to junior doctors in their local community where they can see and interact with him rather than get treated by an expert hundreds or thousands of kilometers away.
roger (2/15/2011 at 6:41 PM)

An excellent article, Gienna, identifying the areas that most people want to know about telemedicine and telemedicine equipment: ROI, ease of use, regulations, reimbursement. As I said, the important areas. I would suggest some other aspects that are crucial in designing the solution that best fits a practice or facility: Scalability - Is the system designed to accomodate other peripherals used in other modalities? Interoperability - Too many vendors have their own "secret sauce." In other words, the equipment they offer works with their systems, but no one else's. Connectivity - Does the equipment require special adaptors, connectors or interfaces to work with your system? If so, you're looking at a jangle of wires and cables and the likelihood that it still won't play well. Regarding Dr. Webster, we're proud to say that she chose GlobalMedia's telemedicine solutions that were designed for her needs at Loyola. Roger Downey GlobalMedia