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Part 2: How a CEO Empowered Staff to Save $3M and Their Jobs



Chicago's Swedish Covenant Hospital chief Mark Newton details measures taken by hospital staff to meet his challenge, and divulges the wider benefits of leading through a crisis by engaging and empowering employees.



5 comments on "Part 2: How a CEO Empowered Staff to Save $3M and Their Jobs"
amber rotter (1/13/2012 at 5:22 PM)

How did Mark Newton's daughter make 50,000 in 2009? What exactly does she do? Oh,I also remember her winning the 10,000 Gala raffle. Was that fixed Mark Newton.Stop firing good employees and acting like you cold hearted jerks are compassionate. Get ris of your daughter's bullshit position. Everyone,especially doctors, hate you. What does Derek Kelly do that he made 339,493 in 2009? Sorry Guaccio, he made more than you.How is it that Mary Shehan also has a family member that is getting paid. P.S. Stop trying to hire more physicians. We have no respect for physicians that cannot be successful on their own. We all know that other hospital is buying Swedish. It's funny how you made sure the vocal, outspoken honest nurses were off when magnat was there. Once you had your magnet status,you got rid ocf everything good. You also cut people's pay and understaffed the floors. NOthing good has happened since you have been there. You pretend to be a class act but you are the opposite.
RN (7/3/2011 at 10:29 AM)

re: Don's post. Don, you forgot other ways that the hospital saved money DURING that year. The evening and night shift differentials were cut from dietary, public safety, maintenance and housekeeping workers. It went from $2/hr to $1/hr and has never been restored. It was done quickly and quietly.
Mike (5/11/2011 at 4:50 PM)

I am proud to say that Mark Newton was one of the most influential leaders and mentors I have had the privilege to work with in my career. he took a the time to invest in my growth and development as a young professional in healthcare that has led to my professional success.
don (4/7/2011 at 8:25 PM)

I AM WRITING TO YOU REGARDING AN ARTICLE TITLED HOW A CEO EMPOWERED STAFF TO SAVE 3 MILLION DOLLARS AND THEIR JOBS I FOUND IT DISTURBING THAT THE DATE ON THIS ARTICLE IS MARCH 25, 2011 THE SUBJECT OF SAVING 3 MILLION DOLLARS AND SAVING OUR JOBS WAS AN INITIATIVE MARC NEWTON TOOK ALMOST 2 YEARS AGO THEN AFTER GIVING THE EMPLOYEES A FALSE SENSE OF JOB SECURITY STARTED LAY OFFS IN DECEMBER OF 2010 ASK HIM HOW MANY DEVOTED, CARING, EXPERIENCED EMPLOYEES HAVE BEEN LAID OFF OR HAD THEIR HOURS CUT IN THE PAST 6 MONTHS ? SOME OF THEM HAVING 20 + YEARS OF EXPERIENCE MANY OF THE EMPLOYEES FEEL THAT THIS CUTTING WAS DONE SO A NEW OUTPATIENT BUILDING COULD BE BUILT ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE HOSPITAL ALTHOUGH ADMINI4STRATION HAS DENIED THIS CLAIM I JUST FELT THAT YOUR STORY NEEDED TO BE UPDATED TO THE PRESENT TIME THANK YOU
Spencer Hamons (4/1/2011 at 4:09 PM)

A great story Philip. One thing that I never seem to understand is the reluctance of healthcare managers to actually walk around with their eyes open and engage their staff. Sure, we have all heard the stories about just how busy someone is or the necessary time just isn't available. This is a great example of how true employee engagement pays off. In this case, because of a crisis scenario, the result was significant financial improvements. However, what is lost in translation is that if true engagement was happening between managers and employees all the time, changes may be less visible, but through consistency would be meaningful. I believe this is a big difference between a "manager" and a "leader". My suggestion is to take the time necessary to make the transition. Stop managing your people and start leading them. Doing this takes some getting used to, but it is like going to the gym...if you make it a priority, that priority becomes a habit. Spencer Hamons http://itpodcast.org/blog