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5 Ways to Energize Your Patient Experience Strategy



Every hospital leader wants to boost patient experience performance scores, and with federal payments soon to be tied to performance, motivation is accelerating. An expert looks beyond amenities and shares strategic tips for elevating the patient experience.



6 comments on "5 Ways to Energize Your Patient Experience Strategy"
R Daniel King (5/6/2011 at 5:32 PM)

The patient experience is a product of the employee experience which is the product of leadership. If leadership is not engaged, and most are NOT, then employees are professionally dysfunctional and the patient experience becomes a statistic in the quality chasm the Institute of Medicince identifies every 10 years.
Mary K Parker (5/3/2011 at 2:10 PM)

I think the 5 points could almost be boiled down to one word: Communicate. As far as point 4, cold hard cash is a motivator only to a certain point and it won't sustain improvement. "Drive," by Dan Pink will bear this out.
Jake Poore (5/2/2011 at 9:55 AM)

Terrific points, Jason. I also agree with Kristin's points, amenities and concierge are a nice value-add, but my patient focus groups very rarely discuss the lack of hotel like homeyness, rather they always reference the lack of consistency between care team members. Having an explicit culture where every team member knows how to express in words and actions what compassion, courtesy, and dignity looks like, sounds like and feels like to those in need...now that would be world class.
Kristin Baird, RN, BSN, MHA (4/29/2011 at 10:11 AM)

Great article. Jason - good job on boiling everything down to the 5 key points. The leadership focus and employee engagement are huge. Once the leaders put the patient experience as a clear priority, the chance of alignment and success improve immensely. Thanks for putting the amenities part in perspective. Without great people and processes in place, no amount of amenities will make up for the gaps. I also fear that organizations that cannot afford to build new, luxurious facilities may feel like there is no hope for improving the patient experience. We disprove this frequently through our medical mystery shopping.
G Harris (4/28/2011 at 11:33 AM)

If you are looking for a model institution that excels at providing a positive patient and family experience even during critical care admissions, I suggest you do a case study on VCU-MCV in Richmond. I would rank them as the #1 Cardiovascular institution in the US.
Dan Prince (4/28/2011 at 10:18 AM)

The points made by Jason Wolf in this article are supported, in large measure, by a study we did in collaboration with The Beryl Institute. It's the largest study of its kind, we believe. It reveals exactly how American hospitals are pursuing the idea of improving the experience for patients and caregivers. Use this link to see those results: http://www.theberylinstitute.org/?page=PEBENCHMARKING