Intelligence Unit Special Reports Special Events Subscribe Sponsored Departments Follow Us

Twitter Facebook LinkedIn RSS

M&A and the Cost of Quality



In our annual Industry Survey, 31% of top healthcare leaders say their organization is likely to acquire another, and 15% expected to be acquired. We ask four health leaders for their views on the long-term impact that this wave of consolidation will have on improving the overall quality of care while reducing cost.



1 comments on "M&A and the Cost of Quality"
Dean Oschwald (11/29/2011 at 11:46 AM)

I would agree that there is power in size when negotiating reimburesment from Incurance companies. However, I have found that being independant from purchasing groups can save a great deal of money on equipment and supply purchases. The other point I would make is that while the Government has listened to the lobby for saving on healthcare cost by eliminating the independant surgery centers, Cath Labs, Sleep centers and moving them into the Hospitals, this will not reduce cost. It will have the opposite effect. I managed a Cardiology group who had their own Diagnostic Cath lab. We were around 10% of the cost of the closest hospital, we had newer equipment and the same Cardiologist doing the same procedures in the hospital. Our reimbursements were much lower that the exact same service at the hospital with the same providers. The Hospital bought out the Cardiology group, and cost increased to the patients and all the insurance companies as well as the government Medicare and Medicaid programs. In a like for like comparison, the cost are higher with the hospital providing the service. I watched every penny and contained costs. Our outcomes were better, only because we had dedicated staff that was highly trained to do nothing else but take care of these patients. We did constant in-service training, and tracked everyhing. We were AAAHC certified, but we were still locked out of some insurance company participation because of the Hospital Lobby efforts. Consolidation will not reduce costs or improve outcomes. Tactical apporaches to conducting business including price negotiation for supplies, equipment and services will reduce costs and specialization of staff training and care to the serivce line will improve outcomes. This can happen with or without consolidation and merger.