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What Would Super Committee Say About $430M Proton Beam Center War?



The effectiveness of proton beam therapy treatments has not been fully demonstrated, but the leaders of two healthcare powerhouses, Scripps Health and UC San Diego Medical Center, are proceeding with massive proton beam center construction projects—five miles apart.



3 comments on "What Would Super Committee Say About $430M Proton Beam Center War?"
SneakyBooger (11/12/2011 at 7:12 AM)

It's a waste of tax payer money. 80% of the patients being treated at these proton centers will be prostate cancer patients. PROTONS HAVE NOT BEEN SHOWN TO BE ANY MORE CURATIVE THAN OTHER MODERN RADIOTHERAPY TREATMENTS; NOR ARE THERE ANY LESS SIDE EFFECTS. See the NCCN guidelines for prostate cancer at WWW.NCCN.ORG.
Mike Van Doren (11/4/2011 at 10:40 AM)

Cheryl Clark's article superbly exposes the myopic decision-making in health care by "rational individuals" who can then play opossum to the maladies, both human and financial, wrought by their decisions because they were not held accountable in the first place. Without better controls there will continue to be too many such examples of people attempting to have their cake and eat it too, without consideration of who's to pay for the cake in the first place.
Leonard Arzt (11/3/2011 at 4:06 PM)

It is ironic that on the day after the writer, Cheryl Clark, and I talked, Medicare published its 2012 proton therapy reimbursement rates, announcing a 15% bump in finalized proton therapy hospital-based rates. It also called attention to "relative stability"in determining next year's rates. This often sets the standard followed by regional Medicare carriers. So for next year, at least, the roller coaster ride remains smooth,and stable.As well as providing greater access for cancer patients nationwide. Leonard Arzt, National Association for Proton Therapy