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Stop Using In-Hospital Mortality Rates to Judge Quality



A paper in the Annals of Internal Medicine highlights a stunning weakness in the method by which many payers measure quality through fatal outcomes.



1 comments on "Stop Using In-Hospital Mortality Rates to Judge Quality"
Carl Denney (1/6/2012 at 1:15 PM)

Mortality is best measured by 30-day all cause mortality. The problem is that hospitals have no reliable way to know if someone died after discharge. Hospitals also do not know if someone was discharged from their hospital, readmitted to a different facility, expiring or discharged to expire later.<br><br> Medicare data have the 30-day mortality included because of the tie to Social Security. Whenever a Medicare beneficiary dies, Social Security is notified, and from that, the days from discharge to date of death is added to the CMS data.<br><br> I think most hospitals/payers would agree that 30-day all-cause mortality is best, they just have no mechanism for accomplishing that. By the way, your captcha is frequently impossible for this human to read.