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Surgical Site Infections Persist, But Why?



A physician researcher argues that there's little chance hospitals can consistently drive down infection rates to zero. That's because there are factors in play beyond a hospital's control, and scientists and doctors are clueless as to what those might be. 



1 comments on "Surgical Site Infections Persist, But Why?"
Paula Forte (5/31/2012 at 3:51 PM)

Your author asks, if we found vulnerable DNA, "Would we do more prep work than we do now? Keep these patients in the hospital longer? Not allow them to have surgery?" We don't have the DNA test to prove vulnerability to SSIs but we do know when our patients are poor surgical risks. For them we DO delay surgery and work with them and their faimilies in a specialty clinc (sometimes for up to a year) to build protein stores, pulmonary function, etc. in order to enhance their outcomes (and ours) when surgery is performed. We are not to zero yet, but for our population which is already high risk, thanks to incredible vigilance on many clinician's part, we beat the NHSN benchmark most quarters.