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Group Medical Appointments Get Another Look



The shared medical experience model, in which a group of patients with a common condition sees a physician for a long visit, is not new. But to make it work requires selecting the right high-impact specialty, working with a passionate physician leader and team, and designing the group visit with both providers and patients in mind.



2 comments on "Group Medical Appointments Get Another Look"
M. Bennet Broner, PhD (6/7/2012 at 1:07 PM)

This is deja vu all over again. Around 1993 I developed a group health maintence group concept focused around a psychologist and a health educator. I shopped the idea to the Center for Family Practice at the University of Alabama, Birmingham; and at Cooper Green Mercy Hospital (county run)and both saw no practical need for it. I wonder if they'd feel the same today? Presently, I am redeveloping the program for a non-medical non-profit.
Adrian Scipione (6/7/2012 at 9:46 AM)

I can't imagine this improving the care that the patient receives. It is highly improbable that every single patient in that group session would be as open and honest with their physician as if they were one on one, particularly if they have concerns about one treatment plan over another. It appears to me that, outside of a few cases that would be enhanced by a group meeting (ie. educating the patient on what to expect from their knee replacement surgery), this would stifle a dialogue in instances where that is very important. It is entirely a different matter where the course of treatment and the informed consent has already been obtained and you are merely going through the specific process and educating the patients on what they can expect. I am a non-believer who needs to be convinced about the advantages of this.