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Healthcare CIOs Opt for the Cloud



Cloud computing is taking hold in healthcare as a form of data sharing and for archival storage. It's an infrastructure cost-cutter and it's helping health information technology leaders solve pressing needs.



2 comments on "Healthcare CIOs Opt for the Cloud"
Erin Gilmer (10/24/2012 at 11:15 AM)

Really good article, well researched. I think there was short shrift given to HIPAA concerns in the cloud. Though some cloud providers are more versed in legal requirements and implications, most are not. Cloud providers are starting to realize they need to take this more seriously but still are often unwilling to complete business associate agreements. And there are real concerns with cloud services that all levels of health care providers and vendors are not aware of. I think though the benefits discussed here are important, more consideration must be given to the legal side. Because HIPAA compliant is more than just encryption and backup storage - most of the law is focused on policies and procedures, training, and responding to breaches. HITECH regulations are anticipated to change the landscapes of Business Associates, which include cloud providers. And the last issue not acknowledge are the international laws affecting cloud services. See this IBM developerWorks article for more information. https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/cl-hipaa/
Dan Haley (10/22/2012 at 10:59 AM)

Great article. The fact that so much health IT is stuck in a 1990s technology rut is one of the biggest challenges facing cloud-focused innovators like the company where I work, athenahealth. The example in this article of a health system spending buckets of money to retrofit a legacy software system (which already cost buckets of money) for cloud storage is a perfect example. That makes no sense - none - when technology like ours that was developed for the cloud is readily available. As the writer points out, government incentives for rapid adoption of EHRs in a way exacerbated the problem, as systems rushed to purchase anachronistic, software-based systems, thereby putting technologies that should be phasing out on a few more years of life support. Some related thoughts here: http://www.athenahealth.com/blog/2012/09/21/ehr-innovation-breaking-news-from-disparate-poles/