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Toxic Hospital Practices May Fuel Readmissions



In the process of giving life-saving therapies, healthcare providers are often unaware that the dehydration, malnutrition, deconditioning, and information overload that happen during hospital stays may have long-term consequences to the cognitive function of vulnerable patients.

2 comments on "Toxic Hospital Practices May Fuel Readmissions"
Nadina Cole-Potter (10/7/2013 at 3:41 PM)

I saw this very thing when my brother was hospitalized in the ICU and Surgical ICU for over 10 weeks. Ultimately, he died after having multiple organs attacked by several different bacteria, one of them being MRSA. Here is the big picture issue: Not only is whatever acute illness that brings the patient to the hospital trauma (not just stres, but trauma), but every intervention, regardless of the outcome is trauma to the body. The article is correct about the compounding negative effects of all the pokes, sticks, medications, surgeries, IV's, tracheotomies, feeding tubes, ventilators, etc that seriously ill patients endure but the seriously specious effects of giving powerful anti-psychotic medications to patients with no history of psychosis. We saw a rational, intelligent, articulate, peaceful 68 y.o. man become characterized by medical staff as out of control and needing not only psychoactive medication but 4-point restraints. Under those circumstances, who wouldn't give up mentally and prefer to die?
Joy Coletti (10/3/2013 at 6:05 PM)

Being hospitalized is a stressful experience, especially if it involves surgery. High stress levels contribute to congnitive impairment, not to mention the impact stress has on the immune system. Anything hospitals can do to reduce a patient's stress levels will promote healing and postive outcomes.